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Superman

This is Superman!  At 13 1/2, he’s just a happy little goofball living in Clarksville who lives up to his name every day. He grew up with an older brother and sister who taught him how to be playful, well-behaved and soak up love like a sponge but the goofball part was ALL his.  

 
Superman is worldly for his years, having lived in Austin, San Francisco, and now summers in Colorado.  He loves the beach and hiking in the mountains but when he is home in Austin, his favorite trip is down to the Town Lake trail!  
 
Superman loves to have a job. When he’s not carrying his stick or a toy around the neighborhood, he carries his mom’s wallet into the store, carries his own treats out of the pet store, and still brings in the Sunday paper. 
 
He has many friends and was recently the host of a Team Superman dinner to show everyone how strong he was after cancer surgery.  But don’t worry, the cancer hasn’t slowed him down. He still walk-jogs 3 miles every day, chases tennis balls, and goes into every Clarksville store he passes to get some more love. 
 
He wakes up with a smile every day and makes it his mission to bring a smile to every other face he sees. In this, like everything, he is a SUPERMAN!!
[…]
2020-03-05T10:14:54-06:00

Coco Harrell

Hi everyone, my name is Coco.  As you can see, I’m a pretty sweet looking 12 year old lab/something (maybe border collie?). And I’m very honored to be chosen as pet of the month.  (although truth be told, my ‘mom’ might have campaigned a little. She’s like that).

Anyway, I live with my two human parents, Lezli and Cole….and my 2 canine siblings Zoe, 11 (black lab) and Hershel, 2 (yellow lab).  But my journey to this family was a bit of a winding road.

When I was a puppy, my first home was with a family in the Houston area. They were actually from the same hometown as who would become my next human parent, and ultimately my current parents. After a couple of years, my Houston family realized that I might be happier elsewhere, and that is where this really amazing Dude, Charlie came into the picture in Austin. He was so cool and we were best buddies. He took me all kinds of places – California, Big Bend, his ranch, you name it.  When he would have to go out of town without me, he would ask his good friends, Lezli and Cole, to keep me. (you see where this is going?).

Well, Lezli and COLE LOVED me.  They even tried to get Charlie to give me to them to no availJ  Cole and Lezli then tried to find a dog of their own – they always told me they were trying to find one as good as me….and […]

2019-03-04T15:47:59-06:00

The ins and outs of pet dentistry

 You bring your pet in for an annual exam and the doctor recommends a dental procedure. For most pet owners, several questions arise:
  • How important is this for my pet? Is it worth the cost?
  • Does my pet really need to be anesthetized for this procedure?
  • I give my pet dental treats every day, why does she still need a dental procedure?
  • My pet seems very healthy, why would we need to do lab work before the procedure?
Here are some basic facts that will hopefully take some of the mystery out of pet dentistry.
Our clinic and our doctors are proud members of AAHA (American Animal Hospital Association) and AVMA ( American Veterinary Medical Association). Both of these organizations oversee the veterinary medical profession, create guidelines for practices, and uphold a high standard of care that has the health and safety of the pet at it’s core. AAHA-AVMA preventative healthcare guidelines for both dogs and cats list a dental assessment as part of a comprehensive physical examination. This means that at your pet’s anuual and semi-annual exam, Dr. Venghaus and Dr. Hill will look inside of your pet’s mouth and evaluate the extent of periodontal disease that exists. If they see any signs of disease ( swollen, inflamed or bleeding gums, severe plaque build up,  loose or missing teeth, very bad breath) they will recommend that a dental procedure be performed.
This procedure will include:
  •  A full mouth exam by the doctor to determine if any teeth are fractured, loose, or otherwise […]
2017-08-21T18:05:03-05:00

Allergic skin disease in dogs and cats

The most common clinical condition that we see at our hospital is skin allergies.  Skin allergies can cause intense itchiness, hair loss, skin rashes, and therefore great discomfort.  Here we will explore the types of allergies, symptoms commonly seen, and available treatment options.

Type of allergies:  The types of allergies that dogs and cats can experience include: food allergies, flea allergies, and environmental allergies (called atopy) which are comprised of inhaled allergies and contact allergies.  In dogs, there is an even distribution of types of allergies, but the most common allergy in cats is flea allergy.  Dogs and cats may have multiple types of allergies at the same time, as is common in humans.

Symptoms:  Allergy symptoms differ between cats and dogs.  In cats, the most common presentation of the various types of allergies involves small scabs around the collar region.  Other less common symptoms can include hair loss or rashes on the abdomen and back legs.  In dogs, food allergy and inhaled/environmental/or contact allergies can present as redness and licking of the paws, recurrent ear infections, abdomen and chest redness and rashes, and rashes of the inner thigh and armpit areas.  Flea allergy dermatitis in dogs is unique in that it only usually causes rashes and hair loss on the base of the back near the tail or at the tail base.  Fleas may or may not be seen in patients with flea allergies. It is always helpful to tell your veterinarian the level of itchiness your pet is experiencing.  Think of […]

2019-03-06T14:54:18-06:00

Reasons your dog should see the vet

Maybe your dog’s appetite is not quite normal. Maybe he has some difficulty getting up. Maybe he is less interactive than normal.  When should you be concerned? It’s hard to know when it’s time to bring your pet to the vet, but, as a rule, it’s better to be safe than sorry. What may seem like a minor problem may be just that, but it could also be a signal of a bigger issue. Here are some symptoms that should prompt you to make an appointment for an exam:

  • Vomiting, diarrhea
  • Increase or decrease in appetite
  • Increase or decrease in water drinking
  • Drooling
  • Weight loss
  • Increase or decrease in activity level
  • Hiding (if normally interactive) or clingy (if normally independent)
  • Aggression or other behavioral changes
  • Limping
  • Stiffness or rising more slowly/”slowing down”
  • Suddenly unable to use back legs
  • Crying out when being touched or moved/picked up
  • Clumsy behavior or seeming disoriented
  • Seizures or involuntary muscle movements
  • Collapsing or any loss of consciousness
  • Coughing
  • Labored breathing
  • Gums that are purple, blue, or pale in color
  • Change in urination: location, frequency, amount, color, smell
  • Bloated abdomen
  • Sneezing excessively
  • Any bleeding, bloody discharge, or bruising anywhere on the body
  • Any pus-like discharge from anywhere on the body
  • Skin rashes, itchy skin, hair loss, dry skin
  • Unusual body odor
  • Eye discharge, redness, squinting, or rubbing at the eyes

……………………………………………………………………………………………………

Remember, if you are ever unsure if your dog is not feeling well, it is always a good idea to bring him in for an exam. Early detection of illness can lead to more comfort for your dog and give him a better chance for quicker recovery.

2017-05-20T15:59:25-05:00

Reasons your cat should see the vet

Maybe your cat’s appetite is not quite normal, and she vomited once. Or maybe she is hiding more. When should you be concerned?  It’s hard to know when it’s time to bring your pet to the vet, but, as a rule, it’s better to be safe than sorry. Cats are experts at hiding illness, and what may seem like a minor problem may be a signal of a bigger problem. Here are some symptoms that should prompt you to make an appointment for your cat for an exam:

  •  Increased vocalizing/meowing
  • Panting or open-mouth breathing (bring in right away!)
  • Straining in litter box, going in and out of box, crying in the box
  • Avoiding litter box, urinating or defecating outside the box
  • Vomiting, diarrhea
  • Increase or decrease in appetite
  • Increase or decrease in water drinking
  • Drooling
  • Weight loss
  • Increase or decrease in activity level
  • Hiding (if normally interactive) or clingy (if normally independent)
  • Aggression or other behavioral changes
  • Limping
  • Stiffness or rising more slowly/”slowing down”
  • Suddenly unable to use back legs
  • Crying out when being touched or moved/picked up
  • Clumsy behavior or seeming disoriented
  • Seizures or involuntary muscle movements
  • Collapsing or any loss of consciousness
  • Coughing
  • Labored breathing
  • Gums that are purple, blue, or pale in color
  • Change in urination: location, frequency, amount, color, smell
  • Bloated abdomen
  • Sneezing excessively
  • Any bleeding, bloody discharge, or bruising anywhere on the body
  • Any pus-like discharge from anywhere on the body
  • Skin rashes, itchy skin, hair loss, dry skin
  • Unusual body odor
  • Eye discharge, redness, […]
2017-05-20T15:59:26-05:00

Annual wellness visits for dogs

The annual visit is a time to review a comprehensive plan for wellness care for your dog.  Components of an annual visit may include an exam, stool check, vaccines, lab work, and discussion of flea and heartworm prevention.  It is also a good time for you to discuss any concerns you may have about your dog.  Here we will take an in-depth look at what may take place during an annual visit.
(1) Physical exam— All dogs need to receive a thorough physical exam, to make sure they are healthy enough to receive vaccines.  If any problems are found, your veterinarian will discuss them with you, and determine if they need to be addressed before vaccines are to be given. Your veterinarian will examine the following:

– Body weight                – Lymph nodes                  – Nervous system

– Mouth, teeth, and gums – Eyes and ears               – Abdomen

– Muscles and joints            – Temperature – Heart and lungs

– Skin and hair coat           – Hydration

(2) Stool check—Also called a “fecal examination”, this searches for intestinal parasites that could cause illness.  Some of these intestinal parasites can also be transmitted to humans; therefore, annual testing is recommended for all pets.
(3) Comprehensive senior blood work—This is recommended for any dog 8 years of age and above.  This will help evaluate the function of the kidneys and liver, check blood glucose to screen for diabetes, check thyroid level, and examine white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets.  Early detection of any problems (before a cat feels ill) can result […]

2017-05-20T15:59:26-05:00

Annual wellness visits for cats

The annual visit is a time to review a comprehensive plan for wellness care for your cat.  Components of an annual visit may include an exam, stool check, vaccines, lab work, and discussion of flea and heartworm prevention.  It is also a good time for you to discuss any concerns you may have about your cat.  Here we will take an in-depth look at what may take place during an annual exam.
(1) Physical exam— All cats need to receive a thorough physical exam, to make sure they are healthy enough to receive vaccines.  If any problems are found, your veterinarian will discuss them with you, and determine if they need to be addressed before vaccines are to be given. Your veterinarian will examine the following:

– Body weight                      – Lymph nodes                – Nervous system

– Mouth, teeth, and gums – Eyes and ears               – Abdomen

– Muscles and joints            – Temperature               – Heart and lungs

– Skin and hair coat           – Hydration

(2) Stool check—Also called a “fecal examination”, this searches for intestinal parasites that could cause illness.  Some of these intestinal parasites can also be transmitted to humans; therefore, annual testing is recommended for all pets.
(3) Feline Leukemia and Feline Immunodeficiency (FeLV/FIV) testing—Yearly testing is recommended for any cat who ventures outside or may come into any cats who go outside.  In addition, any new cat entering a household should be tested prior to introduction to the current household cats.  Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) can be transmitted via saliva, blood, and from mother to fetus.  It […]

2017-05-20T15:59:26-05:00

Anal sac disease in dogs and cats

What are anal glands?  What are their purpose?

Anal sacs are small glands that are located in the 4 o’clock and 8 o’clock position near the anal opening.  They secrete a substance with a very strong odor, which was originally used by wolves and wild cats to mark their territory.  They still remain in domestic animals to this day, although they are rarely are used for this purpose now.   Normal emptying occurs with defecation, and some animals may also empty them when they become frightened.

If the anal glands do not empty properly during defecation—which can sometimes be caused by a low-fiber diet or when stools are very soft—the anal glands will become more distended, and possible obstruction can occur.  Infection can ensue, and, in some cases, the sacs can develop abscesses and may rupture.  Although uncommon, tumors can arise from the anal gland.  Anal sac disease is more common in dogs, but can also occur in cats.

What are clinical signs of anal sac disease?  

Animals with anal sac disease are often very uncomfortable, and may exhibit the following signs:  Scooting (dragging the rear end on the ground)  Repeated licking of the hind end  Tail chasing or holding the tail in a down position  Reluctance to sit/ having trouble getting comfortable/ restlessness  Swelling and redness near the anal opening  In the case of a rupture, a small hole near the anal opening, and drainage of pus-like or bloody material.

How is it diagnosed?

Your veterinarian will perform a rectal exam to assess the anal sacs […]

2019-03-06T14:58:42-06:00

Anesthesia and your pet

Many owners worry when their pets need to go under anesthesia.  Owners may be concerned about the overall safety of anesthesia and wonder what to expect before, during, and after the procedure.  Here we will take an in-depth look into anesthesia in pets, and how your pet’s safety and comfort are our top priorities.

How is anesthesia safer now than in the past?

In the past, the use of only one or two anesthetic agents (at high doses) was generally the norm.  Recoveries were often prolonged, and pain may not have been managed effectively.   However, the newer-generation approach recommended by veterinary anesthesiologists now involves a combination of medications, with lower doses of each, which has the following benefits:   Allows for better control of vital signs like heart rate and blood pressure under anesthesia.

  • Significantly reduces medication side effects.
  • More effectively prevents and manages pain.
  • Results in a more rapid, smooth recovery.

What does my pet experience on the day of anesthesia?

Below we outline a step-by-step progression for pets undergoing anesthesia:

  • Comprehensive physical exam—Assesses multiple vital signs such as heart rate, hydration, breathing, and temperature.
  • Pre-operative blood work (unless previously performed during a separate visit)—To assure that your pet’s liver and kidneys are functioning properly to process the anesthetic medications for a safe recovery.
  • Sedative medication (also known as pre-medication)—Both for relaxation and to prevent post-operative pain.
  • Induction medication—Causes the pet to fall fully asleep.  A breathing tube is placed, to provide oxygen and inhalant anesthetic medication, and to help ensure proper breathing during […]
2019-03-06T15:15:03-06:00